Tag Archives: Deborah Harvey

Silver Street Poets to meet again!

Deborah Harvey writes:

We shall be gathering on Friday 30th September, from 12.30 – 2.00pm, at St Stephen’s Church, 21 St Stephen’s St, Bristol BS1 1EQ, when our sacrificial guest reader will be Deborah, reading from her most recent collection, Learning Finity, and dipping her toe in the waters of Silver Street viability. There will also be two open mic sessions, at which attendees are invited to share one poem (no longer than one side of A4). This can be either their own work, or by a poet they admire. 

A contribution of £4 is suggested, or whatever you can afford, to cover room hire costs and the guest poet’s expenses. 

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Not the Fringe Binge

Tomorrow, Saturday 17th October, we should have been indulging in a day of poetry at The Globe. Like every other Fountain Poets meeting since March, it has been cancelled. I hope, of course, to re-book all the cancelled poets some time in a future that seems to be drawing further and further into a distant and unguessable future.

CLIVE BIRNIE of Burning Eye Books (“Never knowingly mainstream”) would have read to us and run a Q&A on the process of achieving publication. He has sent me a link to the Clevedon Festival website, where you can hear him read from Palimpsest, his narrative sequence of poems recently published by Verve Press. It has been described as “Sci-fi poetry noir.” Clive has three times been short-listed in the Wells Festival Poetry Competition, and he won the Wyvern Prize in 2013.
Here you will find, among others, a reading by Deborah Harvey, who was due to read for us in June, one by Dominic Fisher who would have been our guest poet for July, one by Ben Banyard our April 2019 guest, and one by Melanie Branton who was our guest reader in July 2018.
Claire Trevien made a stop-motion animation of the final poem from Clive’s book. It can be seen here. Clive’s writing is very much my cup of tea, and the animation is a delight. Do try it!

I’m sad to miss Rosie Jackson and Graham Burchell reading from their wonderful collaboration Two Girls and a Beehive; however I have found some readings from the book on-line here.

I hope you’ll find time to watch/ listen to some of these over the weekend.

Trust the poem. It will survive on surprisingly little. A poem doesn’t need much content to survive; its bones are hollow, like a bird’s. That’s what allows them to fly. You don’t need to haul the carcass of a great idea or story into the poem and dissect it there. Poems aren’t built of ideas; they’re built from words. Just enough words, no more, no less. – John Glenday

Time’s mouth is hungry

Dawn Gorman

Our guest poet on October 7th was Dawn Gorman, winner of the Brian Dempsey Memorial Prize 2019, with a wonderful reading, mostly  from her third pamphlet Instead, Let us Say. The poems were concerned with time and memory and forgetting. With being in the moment, observing, and making deep connections. To read and reread this collection is richly rewarding.

Instead Let us Say

Poems in the open-mic included Andrew Henon’s Care Plan, published in Tears in the Fence, and Ama’s The Bad-news Bird, published in the Winchester Prize anthology. We heard some very striking poems from newcomer Lindsey, from Jinny, Michelle, Rachael, Claire, Morag, Wendy and Steve. There were poems from the performance in B-wing that some of us took part in on National Poetry Day, Oct 3rd. You might recognise some faces here!

Poets in B-Wing small

Grief (personal, social, political and environmental) seemed to emerge as a dominant theme, but humour and empathy were present too.

Coming up on the first weekend of November, the Festival of Death and Dying, with, among many other events, a writing workshop in St Cuthbert’s Church, Wells on the Saturday morning, and spoken word and song with Rachael, Jinny and others in the Shepton Art Bank on Saturday evening.

Coming up on 20th November, Beth Webb reads The Death of Arthur:

Death of Arthur

News of members’ and friends’ successes – probably not complete!

Congratulations to Wendy Nicholson, who won first prize for the children’s book competition and Deborah Harvey who was short-listed for the poetry prize at Wells Litfest. A huge cheer for David Ketelby who was shortlisted for the Bridport Prize. In the Winchester Poetry Prize, Tom Sastry was highly commended and Ama Bolton was commended. Ama also had an “honourable mention” in the Poem for Europe competition.

I have been asked to mention the Snowdrop Festival CompetitionCelebrate snowdrops and the world of The Snowdrop King! 2020 Judge: Jane Draycott, http://www.janedraycott.org.uk Theme: Snowdrops, the James Allen story and Monochrome & Green. Line Limit: 30 lines. Three age categories: 11 & Under, 12 to 17, 18 & Over. Prizes for each category. Entry fees: free to under 18s, £4 per entry 18 & over.
Closes 31st December 2019, 11pm.

And of course don’t forget the National Poetry Competition, deadline 31 October. Poetry Society members get a second entry free.

Our next meeting will be on November 4th at The Venue, 42 South Street, Wells BA5 1SL, at the usual time of 7.45 for 8pm. Our guest poet is Chrissy Banks from Exeter, introducing her new collection  The Uninvited, from Indigo Dreams.

ChrissyBanks

Poetry begins where language starts: in the shadows and accidents of one person’s life.
Eavan Boland

 

Dancing with the lights out

I thought it was an inspiring and moving night altogether and your guest poet Beth was wonderful. Such talent so young; where will she end up?

Pretty close to the top, is my guess! Beth Calverley performed most of her poems from memory and performed them well, with candour and warmth. She radiated hope: no small feat in these dark times. It was a remarkable evening in many ways, with an outstanding guest and some deeply-felt contributions in the second half, including one from Beth’s mum, Sally. Some poems made us laugh, some made us sigh or even cry, one was sung with a chorus we could sing along with and one featured a shockingly close encounter with sudden death. What more could you ask from a small-town (ok, small city) poetry reading?

Next meeting: Monday December 3rd at Loaf, 38 Market Street, Wells BA5 2DS: very close to the bus station and car park. Featured poet Rachael Clyne will read from her new collection Girl Golem. And of course there will be the usual open-mic. And Danny’s remarkable cakes.

Congratulations to Rosie Jackson, who won three prizes in the Wells Poetry Competition: First Prize, Hilly Cansdale Prize and the People’s Vote! Rosie also won second prize in the Torbay Festival competition, and was highly commended in the Winchester Festival competition. And to Linda Saunders, who won Third prize at Wells, and Deborah Harvey, who was short-listed.

Michelle Diaz shared a reading at the Poetry cafe in London with Jane Lovell, Alison Brackenbury and Graham Clifford on October 19th.

Morag Kiziewicz has been long-listed for The Bridport Prize, and Ama Bolton was joint winner of the 2018 East Coker Poetry Competition. She has a poem in the current issue of Magma and will be reading at the London launch later this month. A found poem is on-line at Unlost.

Claire Coleman had a poem published in each of South 57 and South 58 this year, and read at the launch in Bournemouth of South 58. She also had a poem (“Erasing the Future”, one of the strongest offerings in last night’s open-mic) commended in this year’s Poetry Space competition, and has been facilitating poetry sessions for Literature Works/ Alzheimer’s Society Memory Cafes; the most recent was on National Poetry Day for Literature Works and Gloucester Library’s Share a Poem group.

Finally, I’m delighted to hear that Tom Sastry, who has read to us twice in recent years, has a collection coming out next year from Nine Arches Press.

Whatever you accomplish, make it look as if it happened on its own.
Dave Bonta

Next meeting

Deborah

On April 9  our guest poet will be Deborah Harvey from Bristol, and we shall be meeting at 7.45 for a prompt start at 8pm at Cordis Mundi, Bove Town, Glastonbury.
Deborah has  three collections of poetry, Communion (2011), Map Reading For Beginners (2014), and Breadcrumbs (2016), all published by Indigo Dreams.  Her novel, Dart, about life on Dartmoor during the Black Death, was published under their Tamar Books imprint in 2013.  All are available from the Indigo Dreams websiteAmazon and good independent bookshops.

‘These are important poems. They carry us through despair and hope, through myths and imaginings, through violence and insight to deliver us to a place where we are not only enriched but wiser … Witty, surreal and above all redemptive, this book uncovers truth after truth and, like stars, sets them shining.’ – Alyson Hallet